Births, deaths, marriages, United States

Wednesday’s Resources – U.S., Social Security Applications and Claims Index, 1936-2007

Each week, I focus on either a new (or updated) record collection at ancestry.com.au, FamilySearch orFindmypast, or one of the other resources that I have used when researching my family history.  This week, since this collection had been mentioned on a number of different blogs, I decided on the new ancestry.com.au – U.S., Social Security Applications and Claims Index, 1936-2007.

One of the main branches of my family that migrated to the United States was that of my 2x great grandfather’s brother Isaac Whimpey.  Since Isaac and most of his family settled in Utah, a lot of research had already been done on the family, and I have also managed to progress further with my own research.  I decided to check this collection to see what additional information I could find on Isaac’s descendants.   Since this collection lists parents’ names, I thought that this collection would probably be useful in tracing the daughters in the family.

The first two entries I found using just the surname Whimpey were the entries for Stella Margaret Bounous. As well as her parents’ names, the entry also showed her other surnames – Whimpey and Whitby, as well as the order (and date) she used each surname.

The second entry was another of Hyrum’s wives – Mary Jane Karnes.  Mary was the daughter of Dorman Clark, and her other surnames were Karnes, Counts, and Whimpey.

So, not only is this collection useful in finding married names for daughters in the family, but it also helps to find alternate surnames for those that married into the family.  This would therefore be helpful in finding the maiden name, and parents, where the maiden name has been hard to find.

There were many individuals that I already have in my family tree that weren’t in this index, so this index may not have information on the relative you might be looking for, but nonetheless it is another useful tool in filling in some of the gaps in your family tree.

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