Amaneunsis Monday

Amaneunsis Monday – Obituary of Thomas Smith

Since 1996, since I first started using a personal computer,l I have been transcribing all my genealogy documents into Microsoft Word.

For some time now, I have noticed the Amaneunsis Monday posts on Randy Seaver’s Genea-musings blog.  Since I wanted to start new series of posts this year, I decided to read up more about what Amaneunsis is, and found the explanation at http://blog.transylvaniandutch.com/2010/05/amanuensis-why.html.

As a result, I have decided to start my own series.  I’ve decided to start with the first document in my family history file, which is the obituary for my ex-husband’s great grandfather, Thomas Smith.

Thomas Smith obituary
Thomas Smith obituary, clipping from undated, unidentified newspaper, privately held by Lois Willis

OBITUARY

SMITH

At the Swan Hill District Hospital
last Saturday, Mr. Thomas Smith, of
Winlaton, passed away.  He had been
in indifferent health for some time
and on his state becoming more se-
rious he was taken to the hospital about
a week ago.  Everything possible was
done for him but his condition became
worse, and he passed away.  Deceased
was 60 years of age, a native of Briago-
long, Gippsland, son of Mr. and Mrs. J.
Smith, of Briagolong, his father, still
living.  Deceased came to Winlaton
about fifteen years ago as manager of
Winlaton Estate for Mr. Holdenson.
When the estate was cut up for closer
settlement some years ago, he selected
the homestead block, and had resided
there ever since.  He was one who took
a lively interest in the affairs of the
district.  He was postmaster, and also
for some time correspondent for the
local State school, and correspondent
for the “Guardian”.  He was keenly
interested in sport, especially cricket,
and at the time of his death was vice-
president of Winlaton Cricket Club.  He
was genial and one always glad to do
a good turn for his fellowmen.  He will
be greatly missed in the Winlaton and
Benjeroop districts.  He was the be-
loved husband of Lousia May Clyne,
and loving father of Dorothea Isabella
Sinclair (Mrs. T. Willis, Mystic Park),
Louisa Jean, David James, May Mans-
field (Mrs. G. Kelly, Lake Boga), Thos.
Clive, Lyla Mary, Winifred Kerr, Jessie
Clyne, Ena Clair, John William, Ralph
Henry and Audrey Joy, also Rachel
Margaret Deering (deceased) .  The
funeral took place last Monday from
the Presbyterian Church, Swan Hill,
following a service held by the Rev.
R. G. Mitchell.  His remains were in-
terred in the Presbyterian portion of
the Swan Hill Cemetery, the Rev. R. G.
Mitchell officiating at the graveside.
There was a large attendance of mour-
ners and many floral emblems were
laid on the grave in testimony to the
esteem in which deceased had been
held.  The pall-bearers were Messrs.
T. Willis and G. Kelly (sons-in-law),
A. and G. Coombs (Seymour),
nephews, J.H.W. Patterson and C.
Nethercote. Messrs Frazer and Horn Pty.
Ltd. had charge of the funeral
arrangements.

This clipping was in a collection of newspaper clippings and photos that my ex-husband “rescued”, when his mother was going to throw them out.  The clipping was probably kept first by my ex-husband’s grandmother, Dorothea Isabella Sinclair Smith Willis (the eldest child named in the obituary), and then handed down to her son, Murray, and then to my ex-husband’s mother.

The original clipping didn’t identify where the clipping came from.  There was no date, and no name of the newspaper. When I first started my family history research, I was lent a copy of a family tree put together by one of Thomas’ descendants, which gave me the date and place of Thomas’ death: 23 March 1935 at Swan Hill (Victoria, Australia).  With this information, I later searched through the microfilm copies of the Swan Hill Guardian held at the State Library of Victoria, and identified that the clipping came from the Swan Hill Guardian dated Thursday 28 March 1935.  Unfortunately, I didn’t at the time record the page and column numbers, although from the clipping it would appear to be the column the furthest to the right on the page.

 

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