52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks

52 Ancestors #16 Ivy May Harley

Over the last 3 weeks, I have written posts about my parents, and my ex-husband’s father.  If I were to work my way through my family tree systematically, then this week my post should be about my ex-husband’s mother, Shirley Patricia Casey.  However, my second post in this current 52 ancestors in 52 weeks was about Shirley, so I decided not to write another post about her.  The next person would then be my grandfather, John Ernest Whimpey.  However, my first post in this series was about him, so I decided to skip him as well.

Therefore, today’s post will be about my grandmother, Ivy May Harley.

Ivy May Harley was born 6 September 1890 in the family home at 33 Hambleton Street, South Melbourne.  She was the second child of Alexander Alexander Harley and Henrietta Louisa Russell[1].

When Ivy was about 2 years old, her father Alexander selected land at Woolamai, and the family left the comfortable house in South Melbourne to live in a house erected from “wattle and daub”.  The following description of the house is from a book written by Donald Stevens.  Donald died in 1984, before the book could be published.  Donald was the grandson of Alexander’s sister, Mary Bell Harley.

”A framework of the house would be erected from bush timber inter-laced with many thin wattle sticks.  These would act as a reinforcement for the clay that would be plastered over the sticks both outside and inside the walls.  The roof was most probably of corrugated galvanized iron, but if this were too expensive, then split wooden “shingles”, like wooden tiles, would be used.  The floor could be of trampled earth or possibly of bush timber, roughly smoothed with an adze, cut on the farm”.[2]

Around 1912, Ivy’s future husband, John Ernest Whimpey (known as Jack), left his home at Tarnagulla, and went to work on the railway line running from Melbourne to the newly opened State Coal Mine at Wonthaggi.  It was while he was working on the railway line at Kilcunda that John and Ivy met[3],[4]

They were married on 22 September 1914 at the Methodist Church in Kilcunda.  By the time of their marriage, John had returned to Tarnagulla to live, and Ivy was still living with her parents at Woolamai.  After their marriage, John and Ivy set up their home at Tarnagulla.[5].  John’s father Joseph bought the Criterion Store in June 1913[6], and John started working as a grocer.  Their first child, Alan, was born in 1917 while they were living at Tarnagulla[7].

After the First World War, John and Ivy moved to Melbourne.  They stayed for a while in the boarding house run by his sister Jane at 50 Dow Street South Melbourne[8].  It was while they were there that their second son, John, was born in February 1919[9], [10].  They had moved to Heidelberg by the time John’s father Joseph died on 13 July 1919[11].

John and Ivy lived for a few years at Martin Street Heidelberg[12], and then moved to Brown Street Heidelberg.  Although they lived in the same house, the house number changed from 45, to 53[13], and finally to 63.  John worked as a grocer, while Ivy performed home duties.

In the 1940s, John and Ivy ran a grocery business at 122 Bridport Street South Melbourne[14]. John was a grocer, and Ivy was an assistant.  While they were living in South Melbourne, their son Ivon (my dad) and his first wife, Joyce, lived in the family home at 63 Brown Street Heidelberg.  After Joyce died, Ivy returned to Heidelberg to help dad look after his 2 young daughters.  John sold the grocery business at Albert Park, and also returned to Heidelberg[15].

Ivy lived at the home in 63 Brown Street Heidelberg for the rest of her life. She died on 4 June 1959[16].  The following is from a letter my dad sent to me in March 1992.

She died in her bed at the family home, 63 Brown St, Heidelberg, from a heart attack.  Jack, who slept in a different room, went in to her bedroom to waken her and found she had passed away[17].

Ivy was cremated 5 June 1959 at the Fawkner Crematorium, and her ashes were interred in the Fawkner Memorial Park, Garden of Remembrance 2 FA-GR2D****29[18]. Her husband’s ashes are also interred here[19].

Sources of Information

[1] Victoria, Australia Registry of Births, Deaths and Marriages, birth certificate 34304 (1890), Ivy May Harley
[2] Donald Stevens, The Harley Family – Chapter 17 Alexander Alexander Harley (: Unpublished – author died in 1984 before book could be published,)
[3] Ivon Whimpey, My Journey (Unpublished story sent to me by dad in 2001)
[4] “Australia, Electoral Rolls, 1903-1980,” database and images, com(http://www.ancestry.com.au/ : accessed 14 Feb 2017); John Ernest Whimpey, Kilcunda, labourer; 1912 Division Flinders Subdivision Wonthaggi, page 58.
[5] Victoria, Australia Registry of Births, Deaths and Marriages, marriage certificate 6992 (1914), Whimpey-Harley; Registry of Births, Deaths and Marriages, Melbourne.
[6] Edna & Ken Arnold, compiler, Tarnagulla & District, The Way It Was (National Library of Australia card number ISBN 1 875342 04 4 HARDBACK ISBN 1 875342 05 2 SOFTBACK: Crown Castleton Publishers PO Box 235, 359 High St, Golden Square, 3555. p. 40
[7] Victoria, Australia Registry of Births, Deaths and Marriages, birth certificate 16233 (1917), Alan Arthur Whimpey.
[8] “Australia, Electoral Rolls, 1903-1980,” database and images, com(http://www.ancestry.com.au/ : accessed 21 May 2017); Ivy May Whimpey, 50 Dow St South Melbourne, home duties 1919 Division Fawkner Subdivision South Melbourne, page 110.
[9] Registry of Births, Deaths and Marriages, Victoria, comp., Great War Index Victoria 1914-1920 Indexes to Births Deaths and Marriages in Victoria, Digger CD Rom ISBN 0 7311 0616 4. (Melbourne, Victoria, Australia: MacBeth Genealogical Services Pty Ltd, August 1997), Registration no 5213 of 1919.
[10] Commonwealth of Australia, “World War 2 Nominal Roll,” database, Commonwealth of Australia, World War 2 Nominal Roll(Name: (http://www.ww2roll.gov.au/ : 2002);), entry for John Harrie Whimpey Service no V43485.
[11] Victoria Registry of Births, Deaths and Marriages, death certificate 15200 (1919), Joseph Whimpey; Registry of Births, Deaths and Marriages, Melbourne.
[12]“Australia, Electoral Rolls, 1903-1980,” database and images, com(http://www.ancestry.com.au/ : accessed 21 May 2017); Ivy May Whimpey, Martin Street Heidelberg, home duties 1924 Division Flinders Subdivision Heidelberg, page 32.
[13] “Australia, Electoral Rolls, 1903-1980,” database and images, com(http://www.ancestry.com.au/ : accessed 21 May 2017); Ivy May Whimpey, 53 Brown Street Heidelberg, home duties 1927 Division Flinders Subdivision Heidelberg, page 46.
[14] “Australia, Electoral Rolls, 1903-1980,” database and images, com(http://www.ancestry.com.au/ : accessed 21 May 2017); Ivy May Whimpey, 122 Bridport Street South Melbourne, home duties 1943 Division Melbourne Ports Subdivision South Melbourne, page 215.
[15] Ivon Whimpey (Wonthaggi, Victoria, Australia), interview by Lois Willis, 31 Oct 1992; transcript privately held by Lois Willis, [ADDRESS FOR PRIVATE USE,] Numurkah, Victoria, Australia.
[16] Deaths Whimpey Ivy May,” (Melbourne)The Sun, 6 Jun 1959; Information transcribed from newspaper on microfilm at the State Library of Victoria Page and column numbers were not noted.
[17] Ivon Whimpey (131 McKenzie Street; Wonthaggi, Victoria, Australia) to Lois Willis, letter, 14 March 1992; privately held by Willis, [STREET ADDRESS FOR PRIVATE USE].
[18] Greater Metropolitan Cemeteries Trust, “Deceased Search,” database, Greater Metropolitan Cemeteries Trust(http://www.gmct.com.au/ : accessed 16 Oct 2017), entry for Ivy M Whimpey, service date 05/06/1959.
[19] Greater Metropolitan Cemeteries Trust, “Deceased Search,” database, Greater Metropolitan Cemeteries Trust(http://www.gmct.com.au/ : accessed 16 Oct 2017), entry for John Ernest Whimpey service date 18/07/1960.

Background of featured image is a photo from Unsplash – https://unsplash.com/photos/xMMh-VFGL9M Photo by Cole Keister

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